Wednesday, July 2, 2014

F4H-1 Intake Splitter Plates

After sharing a copy of my latest drawings with a few selected friends, I was told that the intake profile and splitter plates looked wrong.  They were kind enough to share a few pictures and sure enough, I missed the mark.  So I took the opportunity to research the situation a bit more and redesign my drawings (this time digitizing the contours directly from the pictures).

Here is the result of my research (ignore the paint job, they are all on the same master aircraft drawing):

As seen on BuNo.142259a - plain splitter plate:


 As seen on BuNo. 143389a - pass through holes added to variable ramp section:


As seen on BuNo. 142260a - Intake was cut back and lower discharge chute added (upper scab was primarily to make up height difference between old variable ramp and new intake profile, but also may have served as a discharge chute):


As seen on BuNo. 145315b - holes added to discharge chutes:


As seen on BuNo. 145312b  - expanded upper discharge chute:


As seen on BuNo. 145307b - Holes added to expanded upper discharge chute:


Finally, starting with BuNo. 146817c - Production intake and splitter plate (larger splitter plate, smaller variable ramp, top discharge chute was smaller, intake has new profile):


As always, comments are welcome.

Revision History:
  •  02 JULY 2014 - Original Post
Sources:
  • Artwork by Kim Simmelink
  • Craig Kaston and his never ending supply of information
  • Tommy Thomason and his wisdom
  • Pictures found on the internet and in my collection


1 comment:

  1. Note that the narrow fixed (forward) inlet ramp is the key to distinguishing the F4H-1F (F-4A) from the F-4B, not the low profile canopy.

    ReplyDelete

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